ACM SIGSOFT - SIGBED Frank Anger Award

In honor of our late colleague and friend, Dr. Frank Anger, the ACM Special Interest Group on Software Engineering has joined together with the ACM Special Interest Group on Embedded Systems to present the Frank Anger Memorial Award. Dr. Frank Anger, an outstanding national leader in the field of software engineering, died in a tragic automobile accident on July 8, 2004. One of Frank's primary goals was supporting the crossover of ideas between research communities engaged in software. As an outstanding scientist and recognized national leader in computer science, he worked toward this goal until his untimely death.

In the spirit of Frank's work and legacy, the Executive Committees of SIGBED and SIGSOFT, with support from the US National Science Foundation, have established a student travel award in his name. The award provides $2000 stipends for two students, one named by each SIG, to cover travel expenses to attend the flagship conference of the other SIG. The award is meant to improve the mutual awareness of the two research communities to the opportunities and challenges emerging in complimentary research areas.

Rules and Applications

The award provides a student member of SIGSOFT a stipend of up to $2000 to cover travel expenses to attend a flagship conference of SIGBED.

Eligibility

To qualify, the student:

  1. must be a member of SIGSOFT
  2. must be undertaking graduate research in a relevant field in an accredited college or university

The Application Process

The application consists of:

  1. a synopsis of an original research proposal that the student is pursuing (2 page limit)
  2. a proposal discussing the potential for crossover in ideas between the student's current field of research and research in the fields covered by SIGBED (1 page limit)
  3. a curriculum vitae or resume listing the student's publications
  4. a letter from the student's research advisor confirming that the student is in good standing and pursuing the research as described in the proposal

To submit a nomination for the award, please use the awards nomination portal. Nominations are due no later than December 15 of each year.

Selection Process

Recipients of the SIGSOFT Frank Anger Memorial Award will be selected by the SIGSOFT Executive Committee from those who have applied. The SIGSOFT recipient will be recognized at an awards ceremony at the ACM Conference on Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE).

This award is a unique opportunity to help promote cross-discipline research. All elligible applicants are encouraged to apply. For further information, please refer to the awards nomination portal.

Winners

       SIGSOFT Recipients      SIGBED Recipients
2014 No award given  
2013 Reinhard Schneider (TU Munich)  
2012   Indranil Saha (University of California at Los Angeles)
2011 Aldeida Aleti (Swinburne University of Technology) Miroslav Pajic (University of Pennsylvania)
2008 Basil Becker (University of Potsdam)  
2007 Stefan Henkler (University of Paderborn)
and
Chunyang Ye (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
Cesar Sanchez (Stanford University)
and
Bernhard Egger (Seoul National University)

Dr. Frank Anger Biography

Dr. Frank Anger, an outstanding national leader in the field of software engineering at the National Science Foundation, died in a tragic automobile accident on July 8, 2004.

Born and raised in suburban Chicago, he attended Glenbard High School in Glen Ellyn. He graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in mathematics from Princeton University. He then studied in Germany for a year as a Fulbright Scholar before earning his doctorate in mathematics at Cornell. A world-class fencer, Frank captained the Cornell team, was a two-time All-American in epee and NCAA Fencer of the Year in 1961, competed on two Pan-American teams, and was on the U.S. Olympic team in 1964. After earning his doctorate in mathematics at Cornell, Frank taught at the University of Puerto Rico, during which time he married Rita Rodriguez.

Frank served as a faculty member in the departments of mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Kansas, the University of Auckland in New Zealand, and the University of Puerto Rico. Frank and Rita moved to Florida, where Frank served as a professor of computer science at the Florida Institute of Technology. Frank earned a second PhD, this time in Computer Science, at the University of Florida, and later served on the Computer Science faculty at the University of West Florida. In 1995, Frank joined the National Science Foundation in Washington.

At NSF, Frank directed the Software Engineering and Languages (SEL) Program for 5 years and played a key role in the Information Technology Research (ITR) Program. He co-chaired the Software Design and Productivity inter-agency committee. He advocated for a higher standard of scientific discipline in software engineering research, including emphasis on credible empirical research and practical use of formal methods and of fundamental models of software processes and products. He served as Deputy Division Director of the Computer-Communications Research Division of NSF's CISE Directorate. One of Frank's primary goals was supporting the crossover of ideas among research communities engaged in software research and development. As an outstanding scientist and recognized national leader in computer science, he worked toward this goal until his untimely death in 2004.